ANSI CRLF characters no longer display in binary file view

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Clay Martin 11 months, 4 weeks ago.

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  • #22572

    Bob777K
    Participant

    I have managed in most ways to get ME 2008(11.04) to work in Windows 10, but have noticed that when I open files as “binary”, the CR and LF characters no longer display as a “generic box”. Instead, they do not display in any way, which means that if I then open such a file in “hex mode”, the hex characters no longer match up with the corresponding ANSI characters after the first place where a CR and/or LF occur.

    This same effect is apparent in the ASCII Table; most non-display ASCII characters are represented by a “generic box” figure, but not characters x02, x09, x0A, and x0D. This still works properly in ME 2008 in Windows XP, so I would guess something changed by the time MS released Win10.

    Any suggestions as to how those common characters can be given a “box” placeholder in ME 2008?
    I created an image of what I am seeing, but saw no way to upload it.

    Thanks in advance for your assistance,
    Bob Kreycik

    #22573

    Clay Martin
    Keymaster

    Hi,
    Not having win 10 I cannot test this. I might hazard that you may need to change the editing font. In Tools-Customize-Editing do you have the ansi or oem font selected?

    Thanks,
    Clay

    #22574

    Bob777K
    Participant

    Clay,
    Thanks for the quick response! I have tried every mono-width font listed when I click the ANSI button (both for the ASCII table and Default Editing ANSI font), and they all display — or in this case, fail to display — identically for the hex values I listed. I did try using the OEM Editing font instead, and that does supply a “generic box” placeholder character, so I could do this as a last resort. Those OEM characters are not nearly as easy on the eyes, though.

    Feel free to correct me if I am mistaken, but it does not appear to me that the “generic box” is actually supplied as part of the font file, but is supplied by some macro in Multi-Edit? I tried opening the same example file in a hex editor I downloaded, and it uses periods to represent non-printable characters; thus, the assumption that the “box” is supplied by Multi-Edit so that each existing character is accounted for in the binary view.

    Any other ideas or corrections?

    Regards,
    Bob Kreycik

    #22579

    Clay Martin
    Keymaster

    Hi Bob,
    I’m on win 8 and in hex mode don’t see a box for CR/LF either. But if you see the box by switching to oem then the box is not a Multi-Edit thing, it is a font thing. I guess each application developer picks a substitute printable character to represent an unprintable one. I tried playing with switching files to binary format, no joy.

    Clay

    #22580

    Bob777K
    Participant

    Thanks for verifying this issue in Win 8, Clay. I was beginning to think it was just me!

    So, if it is true that the ANSI fonts themselves once contained a generic box to represent non-printable characters, but no longer do so consistently, then I suppose my options are either to find a customized ANSI font that does contain a generic placeholder for all non-printable characters, or to modify macros within Multi-Edit so that an existing generic character gets used to display something in the place of every non-printable character?

    Regards,
    Bob Kreycik

    #22587

    crun
    Participant

    Depending on your screen resolution, you can try these special terminal fonts that have ALL 8 bit chars defined.
    They are rather handy for seeing control chars hiding in sourcecode , that can throw invisible compiler errors. (ME has all the chars except newline in the buffer, just the don’t show unless the font includes them)

    Unfortunately they are fixed sizes, so may not work for hi-res screens.

    https://realterm.sourceforge.io/#Hex_Font

    https://sourceforge.net/projects/realterm/files/z_Special%20Fonts/Hex%20Fonts/

    #22606

    Clay Martin
    Keymaster

    Thanks for the info!

    Clay

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