DOS/Unix File Type Indicator/Way to Change

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Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #785
    tpaynetx
    Participant

    I would like there to be an indicator on the bottom of the window telling what type of file it is and allowing the file type to be changed instead of having to go to File->Properties.

    Thanks.
    Terry

    #3072
    ReidSweatman
    Participant

    This one’s already there. If you left-click on the small blank area just to the left of the horizontal scroll bar at the bottom of the file (not the area with the letter; that will bring up the Window List), you’ll get a File Properties dialog for that file. If you’re networked, be very careful with the Locked / Read Only checkbox; click on the Help button for help with this item.

    This may not be precisely what you asked for, inasmuch as it simply opens the dialog you were already aware of, but it’s just one click away, and any other way of doing it would needlessly complicate the main interface. And since the existing dialog already provides all the functionality you wanted, I can’t see why we’d want to change this. If you have something in mind that I’ve misunderstood, please clarify.

    #3076
    tpaynetx
    Participant

    Cool. I did not know that was there but I would still like to see something on the status bar like the way that ins/ovr works that will show at a glance without having to open a window what the current type is and allow you to change that time.

    I fail to see why this type of change would “needlessly complicate the main interface”

    #3088
    ReidSweatman
    Participant

    Well, you have to admit, once you start opening up the various doo-dads in the program, you can make things look pretty busy, even on a large monitor. I’d say the fact that you missed the control that was there sort of makes my case.

    I suppose “needlessly” was a poor choice of words; I had a statistical argument in mind. Just guessing, but I’d say the percentage of people working with mixed files across platforms who have to make this kind of change very often are a minority. (Please, nobody jump in with “everybody I know does it that way!” Anecdotal evidence is just the logical fallacy of “Generalizing from Particulars.” And that wasn’t intended as an insult, just wanted to head off a possible flame war with no meaning. We be cool. 8) ).

    There’s a limit to how much information you can usefully put in front of the user (as the Air Force discovered to its dismay in Viet Nam), and I think most users prefer as clean an interface as is possible while remaining useful. Anyway, I hope that rather lengthy screed clarifies my original intent.

    #3089
    AndyColson
    Participant

    I’d say the fact that you missed the control that was there sort of makes my case. [/quote:3ew3odgh]

    I disagree. There is nothing in that little box to tell the user that its ‘a control’. If there were the word ‘dos’ or ‘unix’ or ‘cr’ or ‘crlf’, or something in there it would a) not mess up the interface, b) be usefull and out of the way and use the same control thats already there, and c) let the user know thats a control.

    By the way, I hardly ever edit unix type files, but whenever I run across a perl script that is, I always have to stop for a moment and concider why the display is so screwed up.

    I vote we put a simple string in that (now empty) control to let the user know of the line ending type.

    -Andy

    #3090
    DanHughes
    Participant

    First, the “little box” in question isn’t actually blank. When a file is loaded Read-Only there will be a graphic in it that show it is not editable or when a file has been changed there is a graphic that show that fact.

    Next, I know of no other editor that shows this kind of information. Every one that I’ve used just loads the file no matter what type they are. The only reason this is an issue with Multi-Edit is because it only allows using one set of line ending characters per file and tries to autodetect the type. This will be changing in the next version of Multi-Edit. In it the line ending characters are maintained on a line by line basis so the file will just be loaded and the line ending characters that were used for each line will be saved along with the line. Something that I’m planning on doing is to allow visible line ending characters and when enabled the indicator that you are requesting will be available.

    #4618
    LarryEdwards
    Participant

    Dan,

    It seems then (with the upcoming version) that when I am editing a file with CR terminators I won’t know whether, if I send my modified file to someone else, they will be able to read it properly.

    I work with text documents a lot in MEW, and if one has CR rather than CRLF terminators I want that to be apparent so I convert the file to be easily read on other PCs. If MEW handles line terminators in stealth mode and simply passes them on unchanged in a saved file, that is a big problem I think.

    — Larry

    #4619
    LarryEdwards
    Participant

    Terry,

    You may find my new post, “A Handy Pop-up Menu” in the Suggestions forum helpful.

    You can get to Properties with <Esc>O or a right mouse click and select Properties. You can click your mouse anywhere over your file text to get the menu.

    — Larry

    #4627
    DanHughes
    Participant

    The new EOL support that I mentioned is now available in Multi-Edit 9.10.

    What is different is that all combinations of Cr and Lf are processed as line ending characters but the file is still scanned as it was to determine what the “default” line ending characters should be for new lines being added.

    To force a file to contain only one type of line ending characters, you can use the File Properties dialog to set the line ending characters to the specified type for the entire file.

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